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Starry Eyed ☆


Female. Northern California
#lolcollege student
Biochemistry major. Pre-Med. I heart science.
You will find mostly posts of the San Francisco Giants and San Jose Sharks on this blog, depending on when time of the year it is.
From time to time you'll also find Harry Potter, The Hunger Games, Game of Thrones, Grey's Anatomy, Suits, Community, and Parks and Rec here as well.

Valentino Fall/Winter 2014

embarrassmental:

narcotic:

what if people named their kids when they turn 18 so the kid has a name that fits its personality

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“Party In the U.S.S.R.” by Miley Czyrovanjkovich

bombing:

cop: who the hell ordered all these pizzas

me: you said i got one phone call

ammit420:

diarrhea-princess:

People who drink milk gross me tf out

*headbutts this post and it shatters into a million pieces cuz it got weak ass bones*

gallifreyan-gallimaufry:

leda74:

therothwoman:

beowulfstits-archive:

I want to go to this exact point and run around it saying “I’m in Sweden!” I’m in Finland!” “I’m in Norway!” until I get tired

i aspire to great things in life

According to Google Maps, that point is in the middle of a small lake.

So we’ll do it in January when it’s frozen.

actually that’s why they’ve helpfully dropped a big-ass cement block with a bridge surrounding it in the middle of the lake: for the express purpose of doing what OP aspires to do

hungerfaerie:

Albus Severus Potter starts Herbology at Hogwarts

"Hey Professor Longbottom; My father says I was named after the bravest man he ever knew, did you know-"

"Well, It’s nice to meet you, Neville Potter"

"Actually, it’s-"

"It’s Neville. Your name is Neville"

malijuanastyles:

malijuanastyles:

I think it’s lovely how you can sit in a classroom and visualize having sex with someone and nobody will notice at all

do you know how many angry boys have messaged me about boners because of this post

agaysongbird:

momentary-ecstasy:

Actors that don’t have the same accent as their characters fuck with my head.

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ucsdhealthsciences:

Novel Technologies Advance Brain Surgery to Benefit Patients
Minimally invasive brain surgery at UC San Diego Health System

In a milestone procedure, neurosurgeons at UC San Diego Health System have integrated advanced 3D imaging, computer simulation and next-generation surgical tools to perform a highly complex brain surgery through a small incision to remove deep-seated tumors. This is the first time this complex choreography of technologies has been brought together in an operating room in California.

“Tumors located at the base of the skull are particularly challenging to treat due to the location of delicate anatomic structures and critical blood vessels,” said neurosurgeon Clark C. Chen, MD, PhD, UC San Diego Health System. “The conventional approach to excising these tumors involves long skin incisions and removal of a large piece of skull. This new minimally invasive approach is far less radical. It decreases the risk of the surgery and shortens the patient’s hospital stay.” 

“A critical part of this surgery involves identifying the neural fibers in the brain, the connections that allow the brain to perform its essential functions. The orientation of these fibers determines the trajectory to the tumor,” said Chen, vice-chairman of Academic Affairs for the Division of Neurosurgery at UC San Diego School of Medicine. “We visualized these fibers with restriction spectrum imaging, a proprietary technology developed at UC San Diego. Color-coded visualization of the tracts allows us to plot the safest path to the tumor.”

After surgery planning, a 2-inch incision was made near the patient’s hairline, followed by a quarter-sized hole in the skull. The surgery was carried out through a thin tube-like retractor that created a narrow path to the tumor.  Aided by a robotic arm and high-resolution cameras, the team was able to safely remove two tumors within millimeter precision.

“What we are seeing is a new wave of advances in minimally invasive surgery for patients with brain cancer,” said Bob Carter, MD, PhD, professor and chief of Neurosurgery, UC San Diego School of Medicine. “These minimally invasive approaches permit smaller incisions and a shorter recovery. In this case, the patient was able to go home the day after the successful removal of multiple brain tumors.”